Google's Matt Cutts: Yea, Google Changes Search On Average Twice A Day

Jan 8, 2014 • 8:07 am | comments (15) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Google Search Engine Optimization
 

google matt cuttsThe other day, Matt Cutts of Google released a 10 minute video on YouTube explaining the how search works page Google launched in March 2013.

Matt said a few relevant things that you may have not noticed before. The main thing I took out of it, which I knew, but he made a point to say it, was that Google made 665 changes to the search engine (UI and more) in 2012. So that is about two changes per day. So when people like me go to Google and say, something is up, Matt said - yea, every day we release a couple changes - so something is always up.

Here is the video, it is about 3 minutes and 10 seconds in:

Another thing he mentioned was that he loved that the portal shows examples of spam sites removed by Google in almost real time. So you can see the spam as it is removed. Going back to that, my company built a search engine for the spam sites shortly after they launched it. This would allow you to search the sites Google manually penalized so you can get a better understanding of sites they are removing. Google forced us to shut it down because they didn't want us crawling their examples and giving you an index to search through.

That being said, Google's Matt Cutts also has a video on how search works in general from 2012.

Forum discussion at Twitter.

Previous story: Daily Search Forum Recap: January 7, 2014
 

Comments:

The Anti Cutts

01/08/2014 02:12 pm

I'm not a fan of Google recently, but to be fair to Google the examples sites taken down do look like spam worthless (zero effort) plainly bad design sites made for a quick buck rather than a honest long term business. So Matt, ill give you this one, but you need to reign in the local serps to stop aggregators from dominating every single local search as well as pricing local traders out of PPC! http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/jonathan-guy/why-googles-algorithm-could-well-be-its-achilles-heel_b_3778642.html I don't think Google was built for "local" results as high authority spam is killing small traders.

Mark

01/08/2014 02:58 pm

Google's next priority should be to eliminate extremely aged results -- such as forum results from 2005 that are so irrelevant that they are completely worthless and no longer a valid answer to your modern-day question. More than ever, I am typing in queries and putting "2013" at the end of them, just to get a legitimate answer.

jimster

01/08/2014 04:28 pm

I always add "2014" :)

Mike Gracen

01/08/2014 04:30 pm

I think most webmasters feel like they made 666 changes..

Smarty

01/08/2014 05:20 pm

and all this changes are not for good (at least for searchers and webmasters).

James R. Halloran

01/08/2014 08:34 pm

My god! TWO changes a day? I think every week is enough, but damn...

incrediblehelp

01/08/2014 09:21 pm

Are these "changes" improving search or testing how to improve search? That is the scary part in real-time for all of us webmasters.

Rosendo A. Cuyasen

01/09/2014 04:31 am

I think I will believe on this because there are a lot of people who are now into the internet.

Jitendra Vaswani

01/09/2014 04:38 am

Yeah 2 changes per day.

Jitendra Vaswani

01/09/2014 04:38 am

Yes these changes are helping webmasters. I am happy with google changes

Fox

01/09/2014 08:37 am

They've pretty much done that. You can use Search Tools to only show results from the past year.

marcus mills

01/09/2014 10:41 am

Are there any case studies from the search engine for spam sites, as this would be extremely useful to learn from.

Alexander Hemedinger

01/09/2014 05:03 pm

How's Amazon doing?

Gracious Store

01/09/2014 11:22 pm

What is the implication of all these changes for webmasters SEO and everyday internet user?

ConcernedCitizen2321

01/10/2014 09:22 pm

That's one sick-ass page. Boys & Girls, that's how you do a page. http://www.google.com/intl/en/insidesearch/howsearchworks/thestory/ Dog at 1m53s.

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