RECENT COMMENTS ON SEARCH ENGINE ROUNDTABLE

Below are the most recent 30 comments. I try to keep it clean of comment spam, but some times things get through and it takes me several hours to get to it. So please excuse any of that comment spam.

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Comment ID #2805561668 at 07/26/2016 11:26 pm:

Mark DC commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Aren't you that blowhard who used to complain because Google was showing you what you asked for instead of what you meant to ask for? I suppose that you also think each and every ad click should result in a sale.

Comment ID #2805395217 at 07/26/2016 09:31 pm:

Jerry McCain commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Exactly. Its all just a bunch of smoke and mirrors to make people spend more and more money on ads. I just don't understand why they think thats a good idea. Businesses have budgets, and if theyre not seeing results from their spending (or cutting thinner and thinner margins) then they are not going to hang around and waste time and money on it. I've given them benefit of the doubt for a very long time now, and it just becomes clearer every day that it is an enormous money grab.

Comment ID #2805314370 at 07/26/2016 08:36 pm:

Perry Bernard commented on Google Says Self-Signed SSL Certificate Won't Work For HTTPS Ranking Boost

Barry Schwartz, do you have any further views on this to update to current date?

Comment ID #2805241826 at 07/26/2016 07:46 pm:

Thaumaturgy commented on Google On "Great Post" Comments: Remove Them Or Keep Them?

Transcendent post.

Comment ID #2805176481 at 07/26/2016 07:00 pm:

Paul Hughes commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Never mind the ads. Lots of volatility going on in the organics side of my UK niche. Any word regarding an update?

Comment ID #2804980867 at 07/26/2016 04:56 pm:

Simon commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

This is not relevant. The question isn't whether a human would or wouldn't do an overall better job of detecting click fraud than Google currently does. The question is whether or not Google's current click fraud detection is optimal. And I believe it's not. There are certainly cases where me (a human) and Nick (also a human AFAIK) can pick out click fraud that Google has missed. It also comes down to the type of click fraud. Google is pretty good at discounting all the obvious bot IPs. But where click fraud is by real humans working for competitors, Google seems to make minimal effort.

Comment ID #2804953570 at 07/26/2016 04:41 pm:

RonnySwanson commented on Google On "Great Post" Comments: Remove Them Or Keep Them?

This really helped me understand post comments best better. Thank you for the blog!

Comment ID #2804946684 at 07/26/2016 04:37 pm:

Bryan Wisotsky commented on Google AdWords To Retire "Converted Clicks" On September 21, 2016

Does this mean you can't really separate different conversion types?

Comment ID #2804935539 at 07/26/2016 04:31 pm:

Matt commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

lots of transparency in terms of invalid click rates: https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2549113 / a human (even you) would be much worse at detecting fraudulent clicks than automated models (which already use machine learning); http://www.google.com/ads/adtrafficquality/invalid-click-protection.html

Comment ID #2804906664 at 07/26/2016 04:15 pm:

Simon commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Google is regularly coming up with the latest and greatest automated bidding, but the maths never adds up. These bidding strategies don't result in more products being sold overall. At best, they simply redistribute the same transactions from one merchant to another, which tends to even itself out over time anyway as more and more merchants turn on this feature. There is no benefit to users; they just see red shoes from one merchant rather than red shoes from another merchant. The only net effect is an overall increase in CPC, because Google is essentially splitting off the higher quality traffic and charging more for it. And once this particular smart bidding strategy becomes saturated, Google just comes up with another one and the same thing happens all over again.

Comment ID #2804863720 at 07/26/2016 03:53 pm:

Anon User commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

For lost profit, read THEFT.

Comment ID #2804842715 at 07/26/2016 03:42 pm:

BrianHarnish commented on Google On "Great Post" Comments: Remove Them Or Keep Them?

Stupendous post! Superbly awesome post! This post is the greatest post in the history of posts! Paul Revere would love this post! George Washington! And someone else...and... (I'm sorry)

Comment ID #2804826685 at 07/26/2016 03:34 pm:

Basheer A Radman commented on Google On "Great Post" Comments: Remove Them Or Keep Them?

I publish my posts but no one can see my posts

Comment ID #2804820611 at 07/26/2016 03:31 pm:

Simon commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Nick, you're assuming that click fraud is something Google wants to better combat and isn't doing so purely due to tech limitations. I'm not sure that's true. I recall you've said many times when it comes to detecting spam on organic that if a human can detect it, then Google probably can because it looks for patterns, etc. The same is true with click fraud. We track the full conversion path of every user, including every click from every source and study and process all of this data in detail. Fraudulent patterns are very obvious to me and I could write something that does a better job of picking it out than Google does. The fact is there's a sweet spot to Google combatting click fraud; discounting too few fraudulent clicks results in a bad reputation and advertisers shutting down their accounts, whereas discounting too many fraudulent clicks results in unnecessary lost profit and the occasional false positive. I think Google is precisely where it wants to be.

Comment ID #2804791332 at 07/26/2016 03:15 pm:

Nick Ker commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

It's not even close to my first rodeo, so I do know what to do about it (already did). A small percentage of useless clicks is usually pretty acceptable to me. The thing is that out of all the campaigns I have been involved with over the years, fraudulent clicks are rarely caught by Adwords - despite Google's assurances that they are mostly caught. I happen to be patient about things like that, but most people who sign up for Adwords are not. They don't want to see that they spent over 50% of their budget for the day on one jackass - or jackassbots - repeatedly clicking their ads. My point is that click fraud mitigation should be one of the first areas they try to improve with machine learning (or improve the way they do it now). Kind of a "make sure the wheels are on the car and it runs before painting on the racing stripes" thing.

Comment ID #2804762955 at 07/26/2016 03:01 pm:

Mambo Man commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Cost of doing business. Or you contact your rep - they'll often do something if it's significant.

Comment ID #2804599148 at 07/26/2016 01:34 pm:

Anon User commented on Google AdWords To Retire "Converted Clicks" On September 21, 2016

Google dropped their "do no evil" mantra years ago. They could not possibly make so much money without screwing over just about everyone they deal with.

Comment ID #2804594730 at 07/26/2016 01:32 pm:

Anon User commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Sounds like a win win for 2 thieves. Google and the click thief.

Comment ID #2804582729 at 07/26/2016 01:26 pm:

Nick Ker commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

Sounds cool, but how about using machine learning to do a better job of detecting bogus clicks from competitors? I was just reviewing an account where one keyword received a flood of several hundred visits with a duration under 1 second just about every day from a bunch of different locations within a very short time. Clickbots. For the most part, Adwords can be very good. But in highly competitive niches where some of the players are pretty shady, shenanigans are still way too common.

Comment ID #2804570348 at 07/26/2016 01:19 pm:

Sam I Am commented on Google Says First High Quality Content, Then Web Spam Issues

First, they never promised anything. Penguin is rolling out exactly as they planned - they just don't care about you few miscreants who spammed your way into a penalty and now want to know when Google is going to give you yet another chance. Second, even if they did promise you something on a specific day, why do you think they should grant amnesty for people who refused to follow some really simple rules? What makes you think another Penguin is going to help deceptive marketers?

Comment ID #2804562866 at 07/26/2016 01:15 pm:

Donald commented on Google Says First High Quality Content, Then Web Spam Issues

The point is to work on getting your site in the best possible shape for that day when you DO figure out which those spam links you built are to blame and do something about it. Yes you'll have to wait for an update if you managed to get yourself penalized for some keywords. In the meantime, creating worthwhile content around whatever keywords you didn't already screw yourself out of can keep your self-defeating butt afloat until you clean up your act.

Comment ID #2804514568 at 07/26/2016 12:50 pm:

NewWorldDisorder commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

The optimal bid in Adwords is $0.00. Google's Adwords can't provide a ROI worth a shit. Bing blows Google away by many times over. Everyone else can feed the machine with their wallets, not mine that's for sure.

Comment ID #2804454199 at 07/26/2016 12:17 pm:

what commented on Verizon To Acquire Yahoo For $4.83 Billion

no big words there. your elementary education just failed you

Comment ID #2804368041 at 07/26/2016 11:29 am:

Josh Zehtabchi commented on Verizon To Acquire Yahoo For $4.83 Billion

Smart move, considering they tried to make their own content driven network that failed: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/04/business/media/verizon-shuts-down-sugarstring-technology-site.html?_r=0 "As journalism and corporate promotion merge, there have been many interesting experiments. Some work and some do not. This week one of the more controversial efforts, a site called SugarString which was backed by Verizon, was shut down. SugarString was begun as a technology site to compete with popular online publications like The Verge and Wired. But the concept ran afoul of the public when The DailyDot reported in October that an editor recruiting journalists was warning them that the site would forbid reporting on “spying and net neutrality.”

Comment ID #2804291571 at 07/26/2016 10:46 am:

DreamRank Designs commented on Google AdWords Launches New Smart Bidding With A Machine Learning Engine

But what about the users who are not selling products?

Comment ID #2804291187 at 07/26/2016 10:45 am:

Ralph Slate commented on Google AdWords Payday Loans Ban Goes Into Effect?

This is the exact opposite of the government knowing what is best. A legitimate government is elected by the people, one person casts one vote. Google is not elected, and anyone exercising any control over them generally does so as "one share, one vote", meaning that a small number of people control the organization.

Comment ID #2804199512 at 07/26/2016 09:52 am:

Barry Schwartz commented on Google AdWords To Retire "Converted Clicks" On September 21, 2016

Ugh, sorry, thank you.

Comment ID #2804197892 at 07/26/2016 09:51 am:

GoogleHero commented on Google AdWords To Retire "Converted Clicks" On September 21, 2016

September 21th or September 21st?

Comment ID #2804192145 at 07/26/2016 09:48 am:

Adam Stevens commented on Google On "Great Post" Comments: Remove Them Or Keep Them?

Great post 7/10 (had to)

Comment ID #2804171934 at 07/26/2016 09:36 am:

ds commented on Verizon To Acquire Yahoo For $4.83 Billion

i used a big word