Facebook Explains Organic Reach; While Some Users Are Afraid To Like Content

Jun 9, 2014 • 8:19 am | comments (4) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Facebook Search
 

facebook logoFacebook posted a Q&A on organic reach of Facebook stories and feeds. Meaning, why you see some of your friends posts and why you don't.

First thing, they admit that the organic reach of this content is indeed declining but they explain why:

(1) There is simply too much content being produced that is competing for showing up on your timeline. So Facebook needs to make decisions on what you see and do not see.

(2) The newsfeed is tailored to you, so of the 1,500 items, Facebook will typically show you about 300 or so. They use "factors relative to each person" to customize what is shown to you.

Facebook says money is not a factor: "Is organic reach dropping because Facebook is trying to make more money? No. "

A WebmasterWorld thread has several webmasters who simply don't believe it all.

WebmasterWorld's admin, Engine said:

It doesn't answer my question, which is why something I have genuinely liked just doesn't show up at all.

For the record, I very selectively "like" on FB so that I can see the pages and stories of interest, but they don't show up at all. It really does suggest a push for page promotion (advertising) is on the agenda.

The forum moderator wasn't too happy also, writing:

Personally I think they are buried beneath a barrage of promotional vs. informative vs. fun, friends and family, vs. networking, vs. business relationships that there is no way to sort. I personally think that their promotional efforts have been weak and lame and more apt to drive people away than engage them.

I am far less likely to even give a "Like" to something I appreciate seeing just because if I do, it is immediately followed by their insertion of from 4 to 12+ more totally unrelated things that are sponsored and unwanted. This has to give less weight to the things you really want to see just because of the way they try to leverage any interaction. I used to stop in once a day to see what's new and interesting. Since their changes I may visit once a week. For things I'm specifically interested in, I visit their page and interact there. When I have done that I notice those are pages that will show up in my NewsFeed. I have seen suggestions to actually visit, interact and "Follow" things that are important to you.

I am not a big Facebook user, so honestly, I am not sure what I am missing out on. That may or may not be a good thing.

Forum discussion at WebmasterWorld.

Previous story: Google: We've Massively Updated Our Site Move Help Documentation
 

Comments:

Joey Altherr

06/09/2014 05:37 pm

I don't mind Facebook using their algorithm to determine what you like the most, in order to show you ads or even limiting some of the business "pages" posts from our newsfeed, but please don't hide the content from our friends (real people). Their argument is that they have a way to sort by most recent (which used to be the default like Twitter) but over the past year they have moved it around and tried to hide it, especially in their mobile apps. I'm not sure if money is a motive, but it's hard to think that it isn't when user experience is much worse now than it was in the past.

12345Seis

06/09/2014 08:17 pm

Are people still wasting their precious time on Facebook? oh well!

Ann07

06/10/2014 02:04 pm

I don’t know… To believe or not to believe, that is the question! Maybe people should just focus posting on other sites/platforms such as Instagram and other more that will suit your product. Then try posting few on Facebook. My point of view is: why spend time wasted posting on Facebook when people won’t even see it anymore. Even personal stuff, family posts are being dragged into their algorithms. Let see what happens in the near future. Ann07 P.s I found this post shared at kingged.com try checking it out!

Grammy Winner Taylor Swift

06/11/2014 11:27 am

Facebook is for the elderly. Blame them. The middle-aged will CLICK ANYTHING online.

blog comments powered by Disqus