Google Almost Admits Making A Mistake Regarding Natural Links

Sep 4, 2013 • 8:23 am | comments (14) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Google Search Engine Optimization
 

learn mistakesLast week, we reported on a situation where Google said a link to a site was unnatural and thus the site still has a penalty but the truth is, the link was indeed natural and as natural as it gets.

Shortly after publishing our story, Google's Eric Kuan, posted in the Google Webmaster Help thread almost admitting Google made a mistake.

Eric is a member of Google's Search Quality Team. He wrote in the thread:

Thanks for your feedback on the example links sent to you in your reconsideration request. We'll use your comments to improve the messaging and example links that we send.

If you believe that your site no longer violates Google Webmaster Guidelines, you can file a new reconsideration request, and we'll re-evaluate your site for reconsideration.

I guess this is as close as Google coming to admitting they made a mistake?

Maybe more will come in and fight their cases and who knows, we will have a whole group of threads on why Google is wrong and horrible.

I am a bit surprised to see Google come in and respond to this but hey, it is really nice to see it.

Forum discussion at Google Webmaster Help.

Image credit to BigStockPhoto for computer nerd

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Comments:

Praveen Sharma

09/04/2013 12:34 pm

Apology accepted. Better not to repeat it again.

Merlinox

09/04/2013 12:42 pm

Maybe that email example links was generated by an algorith and so only an human check see if links was or not natural?

ethalon

09/04/2013 12:50 pm

::article to be misremembered and cited ad nauseam as proof that Google doesn't know what it is doing:: My opinion? Google really sucks at communication. No communication would be better than having site owners obsess over one thing while ignoring the rest of the potential issues. People seem to get tunnel vision when making 'corrections' to their site (after you manage to convince them that their site has corrections to be made) and having Google throw in a vague half-statement just makes the pin point obsession that much sharper; blurring out the whole picture in favor of doing 'what Google told me was wrong!' Yea, they may have told you that one thing was wrong but if you would just look over this way... Evil? Nah. The result of having a PR team craft your penalty/warning messages to be as 'sfae' for Google as possible? Yea, that seems about right. Google, you suck at communication. It doesn't seem to, everyone say it with me now, scale.

Michael Martinez

09/04/2013 02:13 pm

Barry, your headlines lately seem to be rather sensationalistic and less than matched by the substance of the content.

Barry Schwartz

09/04/2013 02:15 pm

I think this headline is on target. almost admits mistake is not sensational. If I said, this was an admission of a mistake, that would be.

Dave Cain

09/04/2013 04:01 pm

Hi Barry, You might want to check this out also, dmoz was flagged as an example of an unnatural link: https://plus.google.com/111696587332859976219/posts/G8f9VZcZu5g Fortunately, John Mueller was on hand to help.

Michael Martinez

09/04/2013 04:14 pm

I agree it could have been very different, but I just don't see a "near-admission" of anything in Eric's reply. He said they would take a look at the situation again "if [the site owner believes] site no longer violates Google Webmaster Guidelines". To me, "no longer" implies they don't feel like they made a mistake.

Fedor

09/04/2013 06:51 pm

I don't see anything close to an admission. Looks like a generic copy+paste reply vetted by some policy drone.

Amit Kumar

09/05/2013 07:57 am

I Don't think he is saying that they made mistake. He is suggesting a way like they suggest whole year Barry.

Gagool

09/05/2013 08:16 am

Not only is this site becoming the superficial tabloid of the SEO media, your evasive and ethically dubious answer also reinforces this creep in credibility. What next? 'Webmaster almost gets hold of the whole Google algorithm' in the headline; then the article telling us, no, he's got none of it, but it's OK, because the title says 'almost'? Most SER articles I click on have rather sensationalistic headlines, but then the articles usually deliver one of the following: - rehashing some tired old piece of information, the title dressing it up as some new and exciting knowledge - casting about for words or expressions in a Googler's answer in Webmaster Help on which you can make absurdly bold conclusions, either through leaps of logic or the disingenuous use of weasel words in the title (as in this case)

Casey Markee, MBA

09/05/2013 02:33 pm

Just reviewed a client Manual Action notice with sample links and TWO of the links Google noted had been put in a disavow file a month ago! So that was very, very interesting. It certainly implies that there is still a level of "one hand not knowing what the other hand is doing" with Google or the spam quality team would be able to see that data.

Barry Schwartz

09/08/2013 12:43 am

stop reading

Graciousstore

09/08/2013 02:22 am

Wouldn't it be much better if Google admits in clear words any mistake they may have made in their effort to sanitize the web without leaving anybody guessing what they mean, after-all Google is human and not divine, so the world will not end if Google makes honest mistake and admits to that. Their admission of any mistake they might have made will put a human face on them and hopefully help people will begin to trust them , rather than see Google as the internet monster that is out to get hard work webmasters and SEO,

Steve

09/10/2013 05:11 am

Shutdown SEO business and find out something else for your livelihood. Nowadays SEO is like walking on a rope balancing either sides... huh

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