StreamRotator Blamed For Google Penalizing Porn Industry?

Jul 23, 2009 • 8:53 am | comments (1) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Google Search Engine Optimization
 

About a month ago, we reported that Google slapped the porn industry with a Google penalty of some sort. Soon after we reported the issue, Google seemed to have reversed the penalty on that industry. But we all thought it wasn't industry specific, but rather the software used by many of the webmasters in that industry.

There seems to be a new batch of issues in that adult/porn industry now. StreamRotator by StreamScripts.com seems to be the cause of the next penalty. In fact, a representative from the company came into the Google Webmaster Help thread and said:

I represent StreamRotator Content Management Script (http://streamscripts.com). Lately we’ve been receiving numerous complaints from our users that the sites powered by our script have disappeared from Google’s SERPs. The worst thing about that is that the users can’t even find their own sites for “domain.com” kinds of searches.

It has also been reported that sites running other scripts (not only StreamRotator) have suffered from similar penalties too; however some of them have gradually found their way back to Google SERPs. This has not been the case with StreamRotator driven sites. There are roughly 10 thousand users of our script and this problem influences a massive number of people.

I kindly ask You to suggest me the ways to help the owners of the sites that use our script. We do not have an idea what caused such penalties and I would be really thankful for any information You could provide me with.

I wonder if Google will address the issue or is StreamRotator is doing something against Google's terms of service. Time will tell, but the saga with the porn industry and Google continues.

Forum discussion at Google Webmaster Help.

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Comments:

MM

12/08/2009 03:44 pm

Well, it seems pretty straight forward; the software in question scrambles (perhaps encrypts) the links on the page so that they can't be crawled and "borrowed" by other sites as readily. Gee, I wonder why this would have a negative effect on SEO? The less you have to crawl, the less the search engines have from your site. Sky is blue, grass is green.

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