Search and Branding

Apr 11, 2007 • 5:39 pm | comments (3) by twitter | Filed Under Search Engine Strategies 2007 New York
 

Moderated by Gord Hotchkiss of Enquiro and the Chairman of the SEMPO Board of Directors.

First panelist is Kevin Heisler from JupiterResearch. He states that they got over 1100 respondents to the survey of agencies and marketers. His first slide is titled Agencies Should employ advanced creative tactics to replace standard Display and Pop. He finds that richer advertising techniques will start to replace traditional display ads. Recommends the building out of micro-sites, rich media, etc. They know that this will be a major aspect of Google’s YouTube strategy over time. They will slowly roll this out once people are more sued to other in-stream ads.

In the future, when building a campaign, it won’t be limited to the 30/60 second spots. He actually cites a very creative ad they saw recently from Avenue A | razorfish, using some rich media in a campaign for Coors. Advertisers expect campaigns to benefit from improved measurement tools in the n ear term. 38% of the online advertisers using an agency indicated an increased sophistication of planning and measurement tools (31% of those not using an agency). Following was increased availability of new creative formats.

They strongly believe that agencies need to improve their deep ROI metrics. They need to actually specify metrics and belonging to brands. They need to define branding success metrics. Across the board of different sized companies are all interested in using online e to increase brand awareness. They also agree on increasing the intent to purchase. He showed a slide where he was trying to show the closing of the gap between goals and measurement. This is a huge gap for all different sizes of companies. Thanks the audience.

Dan Sundgren from Efficient Frontier. His presentation is titled “Branding with Platform Marketing.” He feels that platform marketing will evolve into Google, Yahoo! etc. Step One: protect your brand. His “poster boy” is Nordstrom, which actually is zealous about protecting their brand. Also uses the Nike example. In Nike, they actually let affiliates bid on their term. Shows next the example of a search for Morgan Stanley. No top listing by MS, but the top Paid Search listing is a quite negative result indicating Morgan Stanley misconduct. The ad uses Morgan Stanley in the title and description, which shows him that they have not bothered to fill out the paperwork with the engines.

After the “blocking and tackling” suggestions above, he goes onto the planning. Uses an example of Pepsi, which is promoting a design a can contest. They did not match up the Paid Search by buying related terms like “Pepsi can design.” He shows the Google trends tool which indicated a spike in “Pepsi can” searches around the same time.

Shows two case studies that he did while employed with Google prior to EF. First was with Intel ViiV that showed trends history. He likes this type of research because the benchmark is zero since ViiV is a new product. They worked with an agency to setup tactics that matched search marketing to offline branding tactics. Google Trends also shows major news events that occurred, which correlates nicely with the spikes in traffic. The Intel ViiV PR resulted in 15,000% more Google searches (yes this is deja vue, because another speaker mentioned this same case study in a session I covered yesterday). He says the key is to do both pre and post-studies. Remember to engage your user.

Second case study is on whitepages.com. they wanted to test three DMAs (designated marketing area – Nielsen metric) with a different media mix. Each had very different blends. You can run radio and measure the lift on the DMA. Found that CPA’s varied by over 50%, depending on DMA. Brand lift was anywhere from 9-18%. One thing they noticed was that outdoor was very effective. This type of research gives you the ability to go “back to your boss” and show specific variations between community areas. He is eating his own soup…he paid for the term “ses new york” just before the conference. He got 63 clicks for $7.18 which is his blog and the creative is inviting people to this session.

Fionn Downhill, founder of Elixir Systems (and SEMPO BOD Member). She says that her story starts in 1912 at a Dale Carnegie Training session. He started writing his own materials. One of his trainees was from a small little know publisher called Simon-Shuster (sp?)…this led in short to the “How to win friends and Influence People” being voted as a top 4 most successful business books of all time. She actually said that the book was the first one she ever read, “when she was a girl years ago.”

Background of case study she will present, DCT had traditionally generated leads through print and offline media. (The statistics that were orginially presented herein were removed at the request of the speaker)

In short, DCT feels that this is the most successful lead generation campaign they have ever done (quoting Piera Palazollo, the Senior VP of Marketing at Dale Carnegie Training).

Gord adds that now brand building is a participatory experience, compared to years ago. “We are sharing the brand building experience with a number of additional people.”

Note: This is live coverage of SES NYC 2007. Please forgive any spelling or grammatical errors that slipped by n the interest of speed.

Previous story: Landing Page Testing & Tuning
 

Comments:

MO

04/12/2007 12:09 am

I thought this panel was a bit broad. Dale Carnegie Training case study seemed to have some fuzzy math and was a bit elementary talking about how branded keywords have a high conversion. I was far from impressed with this case study.

Don

04/12/2007 03:19 am

Nice presentation by all three speakers. This was very informative.

No Name

04/16/2007 05:56 am

I agree with MO: what a joke of a session. The Elixir Systems’ / Dale Carnegie study was beyond common sense and felt more like a high school marketing lecture. Anyone can bring success bidding only on branded terms. I thought the Dale Carnegie speaker discredited herself by saying her first book was her client’s product "how to win friends..." What a joke! Did the speaker overlook the sections of the book regarding credibility? Apparently not: this felt like more of an elevator pitch for Elixir Systems as opposed to a true case study with hard numbers, not just some biased survey taken by a sales person's best guess. I'm surprised Dale Carnegie didn't end with a call to action for the audience to sign up with Elixir SEM services after such a farce of a case study masquerading as a sales pitch.

blog comments powered by Disqus