Does Registering A Domain Name for 10 Years Help Search Ranking?

Nov 21, 2006 • 8:12 am | comments (16) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under SEO - Search Engine Optimization
 

The question at a WebmasterWorld forum is does registering your domain name for 10 years, instead of one year, help you rank better in Google?

Reading the thread, it appears that most senior members in the thread, feel that it does help.

Here are the arguments to register your domain name for an extended period of time:

(1) Shows the search engine that you are here to stay (2) Google has a patent application that looks at this data (doesn't mean they use it) (3) Secures your domain for an extended period of time (4) Lower price per year if you register over an extended period

Seriously, anyone who is serious about their domain would not flinch at making the small investment of registering for an extended period of time. There is honestly, not that much to lose. There is a lot of back and forth in the forums about why people should not, but I personally disagree with all the arguments. So it costs an extra $30 to transfer the name to a new registrar, it is not the end of the world.

I am off to see when my domains expire, of course I have them set to auto renew, but at what yearly renewal schedule? :)

Forum discussion at WebmasterWorld.

Update: It seems Google has gone on the record saying domain registration length does not impact rankings.

Previous story: Google Sitemaps Tools Sends All Sites Back into Pending Verification?
 

Comments:

Michael Martinez

11/21/2006 05:01 pm

It doesn't help in the least. This is just another bit of nonsense the SEO community has cooked up from over-analyzing patent applications.

Barry

11/21/2006 05:42 pm

Just how it's cheap enough not to complete it, it's cheap enough for spam webmasters not to do it.... That in itself is reason why SEO value is next to zero.

Claude Gelinas

11/21/2006 07:07 pm

It seems unlikely that search engines will ever be able base their overall appreciation of the relevancy of any website based on the renewal date of any given domain name. For instance, take a company that has three domain names all individually going to the same "corporate" landing page: - example.com :: expires 2010 - example.net :: expires 2011 - example.org :: expires 2015 ...would this company's ".org" web address always be the one showing up in search engine instead of the resolutely more logical .com (at least, in this case)... just because their .org is registered for five more years? Like I said, it's unlikely.

Henawi

11/21/2006 11:36 pm

Can any 1 register a domain for 10 years?! I realy didn't know if that's possible!

Jaimie Sirovich

11/21/2006 11:36 pm

I think it makes perfect sense. There's no way to know for sure, but implementing it as a factor (and others) at least as a flag for manual audits would make sense. Claude, on the other hand, makes absolutely no sense. And his example may be more of a duplicate content issue than anything else. Those domains should be 301'd regardless. And if not, search engine will use much more important factors to determine which is the authoritative domain (first sighting, number of links, etc.) -- the fact that domain registration doesn't tip the scales means nothing. I respect M. Martinez's opinion, but disagree.

Jaimie Sirovich

11/21/2006 11:37 pm

I think it makes perfect sense. There's no way to know for sure, but implementing it as a factor (and others) at least as a flag for manual audits would make sense. Claude, on the other hand, makes absolutely no sense. And his example may be more of a duplicate content issue than anything else. Those domains should be 301'd regardless. And if not, search engine will use much more important factors to determine which is the authoritative domain (first sighting, number of links, etc.) -- the fact that domain registration doesn't tip the scales means nothing. I respect M. Martinez's opinion, but disagree.

Kev

11/21/2006 11:46 pm

I think the web hosting companies would like you to believe this and I'm sure they've tricked a few people into believing this is true.

No Name

11/22/2006 12:48 am

@Henawi "Can any 1 register a domain for 10 years?! I realy didn't know if that's possible!" Network Solutions (and probably others) allow 100 years! http://www.networksolutions.com/domain-name-registration/pricing-chart.jsp

Matt McGee

11/22/2006 07:00 am

I asked Jon Glick, formerly of Yahoo's search team, about this in a recent interview on my blog. It was a "fact or fiction" section of the interview which went like this, with me making a statement and him answering if it's fact or fiction: ---- <b>5) Registering a domain for several years is a good SEO tactic.</b> Fact. There is a minor benefit to domains with longer registrations. It shows that the site is planning on being around a while, and makes it more costly for spammers to buy disposable domains. Just like when the IRS determines who to audit, each “flag” is worth a certain amount, and if you score too highly, boom - you’re audited. A single year registration is just one flag. ------- The full interview begins here: http://www.smallbusinesssem.com/2006/10/29/the-sbs-interview-jon-glick-pt-1/

Vic Berggren

11/27/2006 01:23 pm

I can't speak for 10 years but at WMW New Orleans someone asked Matt Cutts this question and he indicated in his reposnse that google does look at the length of the registration. I read between the lines on his comments and avoid year to year renewals.

Joey

03/07/2008 08:56 pm

I don't think this really makes a difference, interesting topic. I'm not even sure how you can get a good set of tests. Probably getting to talk to someone at google would be the best thing... In respect to domain names, you can register for 100 years if you really wanted to... although you probably won't be around to renew after that :) http://www.123Host.com

Mike

03/30/2008 08:13 am

OK, I spoke with someone at google, and either they have no idea, or there is no validity to buying the domain for that many years. I bet that's a rumor that registrars started! http://www.Web56.Net

Win Richardson

06/06/2008 10:05 pm

I lost my last domain name and won't buy another unless I can have it for ten years.

No Name

01/08/2009 08:51 pm

Has anybody experimented with this and found it to work? I've heard it to be true.

Christian Lavender

06/04/2009 04:34 pm

I say you might as well do it. Why not do it if there is a possibility of it being beneficial? You aren't really going to be losing anything and you might win in a highly competitive space. Maybe Google will slowly slip this into their algorithm, so it makes sense to just go ahead and register for 10 years. I did it for mine.

Rob Abdul

06/04/2009 10:31 pm

I'm with Michael Martinez on this issue.

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