Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools from SES Chicago '09

Dec 7, 2009 • 5:15 pm | comments (0) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Search Engine Strategies 2009 Chicago
 

Below is live coverage of the Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools from the SES Chicago 2009 (official SES Chicago Site) conference.

This coverage is provided by Chris Boggs of Rosetta & Marty Weintraub from aimClear.

We are using a live blogging tool to provide the real time coverage, please excuse any typos. You can also interact with us and while we are live blogging, so feel free to ask us questions as we blog. We will publish the archive below after the session is completed.

 Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools(12/07/2009) 
4:33
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Welcome to Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools. #SESCHI
Monday December 7, 2009 4:33 aimClear
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From conference orginizers: Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools
With the volume of information available, search engines can tell you a lot about your customers: How they think, what they are looking for, what's most important to them, and how their needs change as they move through the buying process.

Web analytics tools provide insight into the people who have already found and visited your website. But search engines can tell you about the entire online population. This collective set of data can be viewed as a gigantic, publicly available research study; your very own focus group... and all for free! This session will cover how to use search engines and search engine research tools to answer these critical questions:

Monday December 7, 2009 4:34 aimClear
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  • Specifically, what are my customers looking for?
  • How do their needs change as they move through the buying process?
  • Where are my prospects and customers located?
  • Do customers in one region have different needs than those in another?
  • Do they have seasonal needs?
  • What are the demographic attributes of my customers?
  • How are my customers' needs changing over time?


Monday December 7, 2009 4:34 aimClear
4:35
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Moderator: Patricia Hursh, President, SmartSearch Marketing has introduced
Graham Mudd, Vice President, Search & Media, comScore, Inc
Monday December 7, 2009 4:35 aimClear
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Speaker Profile


Permalink
Graham Mudd Graham Mudd
Vice President, Search & Media
comScore, Inc.


Graham Mudd manages and develops client relationships with a number of prominent Internet companies in the search and media sectors, including Google, Fox Interactive Media, Hulu, Disney and Glam Media.

Monday December 7, 2009 4:35 aimClear
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Paid clicks is up above 18%, from 07 ' to May 09'
Monday December 7, 2009 4:36 aimClear
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While search volume has grown, ad coverage has decreased.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:36 aimClear
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There are a bunch of quality issues undeway at engines to make sure that ads are relevent. Therefore PPC coverage has gone down over time.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:36 aimClear
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There is an increase of longtail search activity.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:37 aimClear
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Search has never been more important and consumer interested continues to grow. The bad news is that there is more competition and keyword complexity.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:38 aimClear
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The 4 major search engine tool categories are: 1) Who are the searchers in my category? 2) What is their behavior? 3) What are they exposed to>? share of voice, engine opportunity analysis, copy analysis. What do they click on, share of search, share of clicks by term and by organic /paid.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:40 aimClear
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Know your KW audience which can include, size, region, age, income, presense of children, household size, engine preferences and Internet behavior.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:41 aimClear
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Regional KW differences are real and important.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:42 aimClear
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For instance, people who search for Gym shoes: 66% in midwest, 350% more liely to be midwestern, top cities Lemhurst, IL, Chicago, Cincinnati, Southfield, MI, Detroit. Sneakers are 53% morte likly on the East Coast and from New England, etc...
Monday December 7, 2009 4:43 aimClear
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"Sofas Vs Couches" 17% of "sofa" shop at IKEA, "Coach at Home Depot.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:44 aimClear
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Do you search for "Flat Screen" or "HD?" HD users tend to be on the West Coast and visit CNET, "Flat Screen" Shop at Best Buy.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:45 aimClear
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Ask What terms bring consumers to your competitors sites?
Monday December 7, 2009 4:45 aimClear
4:46
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He's showing Google's Search-based KW tools
Monday December 7, 2009 4:46 aimClear
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Let Google tell you which terms relevant for each page of your site. It's a no-brander to let Google tell you which KWs work for each page. He's showing GOOGs KW research tools for page scraping.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:47 aimClear
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Seasonal differences are real and important.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:47 aimClear
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Share of Voice; The relative amount of exposure of an advertiser within a defined market sctor over a period of time. --Enquiro Marketing Dictionary
Monday December 7, 2009 4:48 aimClear
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Need it to build brands because users can't click if they can't see it.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:48 aimClear
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The first step in gaining share is knowing your competition
Monday December 7, 2009 4:49 aimClear
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Tracking competitors' search volume by engine allows you comparison for your own traffic. Are you failing in the space or are the trends natural. Check out www.spyfu.com, www.adguru.com, www.comscore.com, www.keywordspy.com.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:51 aimClear
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The difference in search engine mix (Yahoo, Google, Bing) because understanding distribution of exposures allows for proper allocation of efforts to increase exposure. Choose the strategy, paid, organic, product mix, types of phrases that bring volume in, all of the free tools especially Google tell where the volume can come from.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:54 aimClear
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Gap analysis: Compare top keywords for your competitors to your own. This is measured in clicks. Look for competitive gaps, then figure out what is working for the competition.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:55 aimClear
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Understand who your competition is and how/where their clicks come from.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:56 aimClear
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Who are the searchers? What are they actually searching for? What are they exposed to in all channels SERPs? (Share of voice). What KWs to users click on when the go to competitors.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:57 aimClear
4:58
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Total category share of search, by term and is it coming from organic or paid? Whew!@ That was very cool.
Monday December 7, 2009 4:58 aimClear
5:00
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Brian Ussery, Director of SEO, Search Discovery is up next
Monday December 7, 2009 5:00 aimClear
5:00
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Speaker Profile


Permalink
Brian Ussery Brian Ussery
Director of SEO
Search Discovery

@beussery

Brian E. Ussery is Director of SEO Technology at Search Discovery, Inc. Ussery is one of the world's foremost authorities on SEO, especially issues related to SEO for Flash. He is a Top Contributor and Bionic Poster on Google Webmaster Central, Moderator for Google Issues on SearchEngineWatch.com and SES Groups Administrator on Facebook, Linkedin and Twitter. In addition to his own top-ranked "beu blog" and the SearchEngineWatch.com Blog, Brian is a frequent contributor on Blogoscoped.com, the "editorial board and echo chamber for all things Google" according to "The Google Story." Away from SEO, Brian is an Official Artist for the University of Georgia, authorized by Nike and the Collegiate Licensing Company, a consortium which consists of more than 200 colleges and universities, bowl games, conferences, The NCAA, Final Four, College World Series and Heisman Trophy Award.

Monday December 7, 2009 5:00 aimClear
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Make great content by focusing on keyword intent...
Monday December 7, 2009 5:01 aimClear
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But how do you do that? Where do you start? It's best in most cases to start with one authoritative site and Google's free tools.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:01 aimClear
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First he went to Google Ad Planner, he gleened gender, education, age, household income, to develop "personas" to develop the wright KWs. Find customers' intent.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:02 aimClear
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Next Brian vists Insights for Search, another free Google product. He's compating the terms "Uga? and "University of Georgia."
Monday December 7, 2009 5:04 aimClear
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He's showing Google's Wonder Wheel, part of Google's toobar.belt. It's a very good way to do KW research.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:05 aimClear
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See how visually the child categories are related to the parent categories. What related topics may be of interest to customers.?
Monday December 7, 2009 5:06 aimClear
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The basic deal here is that we should use all tools available to profile and compare users' behavior in relation to KWs, with all other associated information.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:07 aimClear
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47% of customers expect a web page to load in 2 seconds or less. 40% of consumers will wait no more than 3 seconds for a web page to render before abandoning the site, Akamai 2009. Googe's new site performance tool, gives load information from Google ToolBar data to illustrate overall how your page fares compares to other sites.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:09 aimClear
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http://code.google.com;speed to diagnose and make suggestions for site performance.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:10 aimClear
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That concludes our coverage of Customer Insights via Search Engine Tools. #SESCHI. It was a wonderful session.
Monday December 7, 2009 5:11 aimClear
5:12
 

 
 
 

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