Hyperlinking Keywords to the Same Page: Spam, Usability Issue, or Both?

Jul 2, 2007 • 11:05 am | comments (9) by twitter | Filed Under Link Building Tips & SEO
 

A webmaster asks WebmasterWorld if hyperlinking terms on a single page to link back to that page is considered spam. His argument is that it shouldn't be construed as spam if it's only being used for emphasis.

However, the majority of forum members feel that on-page hyperlinks, in excess, are spammy practices. Further, some feel that it does not create a pleasurable user experience because they'd be clicking on the link and wouldn't go anywhere.

emphasizing is not bad, over-emphasizing is spam.

He is advised by many members, including tedster, the administrator of WebmasterWorld, to remove the links. londrum says that there is no benefit to internal links.

the benefit that you get out of [internal link text] is practically zero. the text on links coming from other sites to yours is still pretty important. but internal links aren't worth all that much anyway."

Forum discussion continues at WebmasterWorld.

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Comments:

Brian Mark

07/02/2007 03:23 pm

It's also worthwhile if you're getting scrapers pulling content, or if your site attaches web pages that get emailed when someone "Sends to a friend". I don't think it makes sense from an SEO standpoint, but there are some times that it makes sense.

Michael Martinez

07/02/2007 03:59 pm

It can only be spammy if the search engines use the intrapage links (and they don't) AND if the links are excessive. The concerns people expressed are based on ignorance.

Ryan

07/02/2007 05:42 pm

wait, who says search engines don't follow intrapage links? It would only make sense that they DO follow them. If they don't, how else would they index your entire site?

Tamar Weinberg

07/02/2007 06:51 pm

"wait, who says search engines don't follow intrapage links? It would only make sense that they DO follow them. If they don't, how else would they index your entire site?" Ryan, I think the suggestion was more in the context of whether you can have 1000 intrapage links to "blue widgets" and actually think that will boost your rankings for "blue widgets." Without a doubt, search engines will typically discover your website through internal links, but is there really any scientific proof that adding thousands of intrapage links to the same page will actually cause you to rank higher for those linked-to terms? I think that's really the point he was trying to drive home.

Ryan

07/02/2007 08:21 pm

Ahh, I misunderstood Looking at it that way, I'd argue that it still does help. One of my pages shows up for the term "add a word" which is not included anywhere on the page itself, but is a link in the footer of all the pages on my site. The fact that google shows the page this text links to, and not my homepage that includes that text would lead me to believe it does actually matter.

teddie

07/03/2007 01:44 pm

Intrapage = within the page In this discussion bookmarks and loopback links. Intrasite = within the website Intranet = within the network path#bookmark URLs are a basic web design feature that do precisely this but are useful to users and web designers and certainly not spam. Loopback links for the sake of it with no usefulness or purpose other than increasing link counts and keyphrase text frequency, with no referenced bookmark target could be logically be considered such though. And for the record Google does index intrapage bookmarks. A quick search for commonly used bookmarks demonstrates my case quite clearly. http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=allinanchor%3A+%22back+to+top%22

Michael Martinez

07/03/2007 06:55 pm

No, Google does not count intrapage links (nor does it follow them). Also, your query is malformed. There cannot be a space between the colon and the query string. Also, "allinanchor" and "inanchor" only tell the search engine to select pages that have the specified keyword(s) in anchor text pointing to them. Those query operators do NOT tell the search engine to show only pages that have the keyword(s) in outbound link anchor text (as many SEOs wrongly believe, probably because of all the malformed queries).

teddie

07/03/2007 08:16 pm

Micheal. 1) Malformed query. Nope. The results are the same with or without a space and Googles advance search page itself actually inserts a space. 2) "Also, "allinanchor" and "inanchor" only tell the search engine to select pages that have the specified keyword(s) in anchor text pointing to them." So you are agreeing with me then. The point was the terms I selected are mostly only in the anchor text to a page and in most cases within anchor text of intrapage links, therefore the links needed to be indexed as such. It's an easy test to run yourself if you want, and would be simple to do, for the sake of brevity.

teddie

07/03/2007 08:23 pm

Here's a better example: [allinanchor: "return to top"] less other types of results such as blog posts. http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=allinanchor%3A+%22return+to+top%22

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