Google Logo Not Broken, It's Morse Code

Apr 27, 2009 • 8:21 am | comments (20) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Search Engine Industry News
 

If you visit Google.com today, you may notice a new logo on the home page. The logo looks like this:

Google Morse Code logo

The logo is to remember Samuel Morse who was born on April 27, 1791. Today is his birthday, and Samuel Morse invented Morse code.

We have several threads on the topic, many of them asking why is Google's logo broken. In fact, one asked why is Google's logo not fully loading?

Googler, Jamie created a Google Web Search Thread specifically to talk about why Google changes their logo on special days.

FYI, Google had a Google Braille logo back in 2006.

Forum discussion at Google Web Search Help, Google Webmasters Help and DigitalPoint Forums.

Previous story: Video Recap of Weekly Search Buzz :: April 24, 2009
 

Comments:

Kim

04/27/2009 02:57 pm

I immediately got that it was code (I'm a HAM radio operator) but why the shift in letters? I assume that the code would have been written "--. --- --- --. .-.. ." but each letter is shifted up/down.

Kim

04/27/2009 02:58 pm

I immediately got that it was code (I'm a HAM radio operator) but why the shift in letters? I assume that the code would have been written "--. --- --- --. .-.. ." but each letter is shifted up/down.

Steve

04/27/2009 03:08 pm

I also noticed it right away, I'm also a HAM radio operator and asked the same question. Why the shift down with some of the letters?

Ben

04/27/2009 03:11 pm

It's probably to make it more interesting- i know it may have been more correct to do it in a line, but it's more interesting this way :P I managed to figure it out pretty quickly, but i know nothing about Ham radio- it was just pretty obvious to me, no idea why.

Mark

04/27/2009 03:41 pm

Up/Down shift indicates sylabols: Up begins new sylabol. Except for last letter E(.) which is Up and indicates End of Transmission. Or, intentionally scrambled so fools like me would write to point out that Google goofed.

Keri Morgret

04/27/2009 04:23 pm

My guess is that they did it to save space. If they had put everything in line, it would be much longer. I never knew of e to signal the end of a transmission, at least in ham radio. I can't remember the exact abbreviation, but it is two letters run together, and probably six dots and dashes. N6TME

Keri Morgret

04/27/2009 04:25 pm

On a semi-related note, most people have no idea that a common alert tone for SMS is actually the letters SMS in Morse Code (dih dih dih dah dah dih dih dih)

arpan kulshrestha

04/27/2009 04:27 pm

its a grt work to remind such a great person...but may i know how do we decript the logo of the google

Barry Schwartz

04/27/2009 04:52 pm

Arpan, you can use http://www.onlineconversion.com/morse_code.htm

Duncan Hill

04/27/2009 06:22 pm

"Describing the Irish as a teeming sea of ignorant, dirty, overly fertile drunks, he ran for office on a platform of keeping America 'pure.'" "1836 saw his first of two campaigns to become Mayor of New York City. He ran for, and was apparently a fairly rabid spokesperson for, the Nativist party. This was a group of fairly despicable human beings. A bunch of racist, pro-slavery assholes, who were dead set against immigrants, especially the Jewish and the Irish. Morse himself appeared to especially hate Catholics. His campaign didn't go all that well, which is likely a good thing. He only managed to get 1,550 votes the first time, and garnered a mere 100 the second time he ran, in 1841." He "hated" American Catholics and "would have denied citizenship to the foreign born (especially the Irish) and he wrote pamphlets abusing those who would abolish slavery". That's right. He loved slavery and enslaving black people. He said it was "not a sin" in Christianity, and that slave owners were doing so for the "wisest purposes, benevolent and disciplinary". Sounds a bit like a 19th century version of the White Supremacists, only wearing smarter clothes and without the skinheads. He donated loads of money to these idiots. So much for Google's "Don't be evil". He didn't invent the telegraph anyway. And the "Morse" code used these days is not the same code that Morse invented. It is only called "Morse" code because it is based on it.

CJ

04/27/2009 06:26 pm

i think it is vsry special that google honors people in this cool way. and lots of people usegoogle so they willsee it

Kim Hood

04/27/2009 07:06 pm

I noticed it was Morse code from the walkie-talkies we used to play with when we were kids. Pretty Cool!

Kim Hood

04/27/2009 07:19 pm

I noticed it was code from the walkie-talkies we used to play with as kids. Pretty Cool

osuruk

04/27/2009 08:03 pm

thats farting awsome

No Name

04/27/2009 08:49 pm

For those of us who were in the Boy Scouts (and needed to learn Morse Code to get our badges) -- it was pretty easy to figure out Google's trick (although I must admit that I thought for a moment that I'd stumbled on a foreign language version of Google!)

Fraser

04/28/2009 04:02 am

I don't know morse code, but used the positioning (ie. the different lines) to figure out that this was morse code. I could tell that the Gs were the same, and the Os were the same. This logo, was meant as both a tribute to Samuel Morse, but as well, needed to be able to be understood by the millions of Google users...

Fraser

04/28/2009 04:05 am

FYI, if I had to guess, if they would have wanted to save space, they would have made everthing smaller. The logo has NOTHING to do with saving space, but rather, making it readable for those (ie. 98 percent of the internet) who have NO knowledge of what morse code actually is.

Fraser

04/28/2009 04:06 am

FYI, if I had to guess, if they would have wanted to save space, they would have made everything smaller. The logo has NOTHING to do with saving space, but rather, making it readable for those (ie. 98 percent of the internet) who have NO knowledge of what morse code actually is.

David

04/29/2009 01:20 am

I type the date into google, an well it came up morse birthday and well it does not take a genius to work out that this was google way of celebrating it.

Pat

05/08/2009 09:54 pm

I've been an amateur radio operator since I was 12 (in 1980). As a fan of Morse Code I was happy to see Google do this. Very cool.

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