The Average Google Searcher Spends 7 Seconds...

Aug 4, 2005 • 11:17 am | comments (2) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Search Technology
 

SP32-20050804-104047.gif The average Google searcher spends less than seven seconds looking at a search results page before they make a decision to click. Your challenge... get them to notice your ad or organic listing. I got a call this morning from Marketing Sherpa informing me of the complete eye tracking study has finally been released by Enquiro Search Solutions, including 64 screenshots, 37 charts on data collected from an ongoing study on the behavior of the eye on search results.

At SES New York, I wrote about Eye Tracking and Search Combine to give us the Golden Triangle, that magic "F" shape area that the eye scans a search engine result page. I was pretty interested in the study and found it could help answer and generate a good amount of questions. Based on the complete study they have defined five specific patterns people tend to use depending on where they are in the sales/educational cycle, such as the Quick Click, Linear Scan, Golden Triangle Scan, Deliberate Scan, and Pick Up Search.

Other questions we have all wondered about at one time or another:

Does adding prices to your copy make a difference in the way people look at your ads and organic listings?

How does the use of bold affect the way people read your copy?

Should the keyword always be included in the title? (Worth noting if you're using ad groups for lots of niche keywords.)

The report for purchase can be found here on the Marketing Sherpa site. You will probably want to visit that one first if interested. I could not find any forum threads on this topic.

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Comments:

Marina Garrison

08/04/2005 04:26 pm

I just wanted to clarify that it is actually Enquiro Search Solutions that has released the Eye Tracking Study. Marketing Sherpa is a distributor.

Benjamin Pfeiffer

08/04/2005 04:47 pm

Hi Marina, Thanks for the note. I have changed the post to reflect the correct information. Ben

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