The Search Engine of Choice by the Search Companies

Jan 6, 2005 • 8:47 am | comments (2) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Search Engine Industry News
 

Recently there was a blog entry that came out named What Search Engines Do Search Engine Companies Use? over at Inside Google. It was that blog entry that sprung a topic of discussion over at Search Engine Watch forums named Should Yahoo employees search elsewhere?.

The extreme point in the entry was this quote;

Finally, at Yahoo, 68.9% of employees use Yahoo, but a still-strong 29.8% use Google (compare that to Google's 100% loyalty).

Jeremy Zawodny said I don't believe the search numbers.... First off, Jeremy questions the data collection page which reads; "There is some data that we do not aggregate. For example, we do not collect information on search terms used. We also do not aggregate information on what specific pages or websites people visit." And second, he makes a nice point with this remark; "Anyway, the next problem I see is what that 100% Google figure. That seems to imply that Google never bothers to check out the competition. Is that really true? I know for a fact that it's not."

The author of the original blog entry then commented on Jeremy's entry saying;

Well, VisitorVille compiles the data through visitors to the websites who contract it for user data. That means all of the data is based on sites visited through search engines. In turn, that means that only successful searches are counted, not test searches, because test searches rarely result in a click through. This means that Google employees who search for websites all use Google, and they only use other engines for testing, while Yahoo employees do use Google to find stuff.

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Comments:

Steven

01/06/2005 06:28 pm

Google is a cult that only hires their breed that is why 100% use google

orion

01/10/2005 02:43 pm

A cardinal rule consists in using a representative sample of the universe you are polling. So if the universe consists of x=30%, Y=40% and Z=30% you would need to test a scaled-down sample of searchers behaviors. Taking Jeremy concerns at face value then I doubt these stat results represent valid sampling data. Orion

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