Google's Cost Per Click Continues To Decline

Apr 16, 2012 • 8:36 am | comments (2) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Google News & Finances
 

GOOG EarningsGoogle announced their first quarter earnings for 2012 and it was nothing less but awesome. What upset investors seemed to be the stock split plan, but overall the earnings are great.

Despite the cost per click continuing to decline, the volume of paid clicks continues to rise, leading to higher revenues for Google.

Here are the highlights:

  • 24% increase in revenues, revenues of $10.65 billion in the first quarter of 2012
  • Net income in the first quarter of 2012 was $2.89 billion
  • Aggregate paid clicks, which include clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, increased approximately 39% over the first quarter of 2011 and increased approximately 7% over the fourth quarter of 2011.
  • Average cost-per-click, which includes clicks related to ads served on Google sites and the sites of our Network members, decreased approximately 12% over the first quarter of 2011 and decreased approximately 6% over the fourth quarter of 2011.
  • As of March 31, 2012, cash, cash equivalents, and short-term marketable securities were $49.3 billion.
  • On a worldwide basis, Google employed 33,077 full-time employees as of March 31, 2012, up from 32,467 full-time employees as of December 31, 2011.

Brin and Page also explained their motives for the stock split in the founders letter basically saying it is a way for them to keep control of the company.

Forum discussion at WebmasterWorld and Google+.

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Comments:

Panda

04/16/2012 04:30 pm

Google's effort to send less and less visitors to our sites will continue. 39% increase over last year. At least now Matt Cutts is honest when he says Google only wants users to click on ads and sites to advertise.

Webstats Art

06/04/2012 05:56 pm

Yeh.. almost everyone has been hit in many ways. A lot of dissension is in the air. I won't be surprised if something else splits other than the stock in the future

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