Retailer SEM Tactics

Mar 1, 2006 • 9:44 am | comments (2) by twitter Google+ | Filed Under Search Engine Strategies 2006 New York
 

Alan Dick is moderating the retailer sem tactics, from Vintage Tub and Bath.

Shane Wagg from Rugman.com - He is an organic guy since Alta Vista... - He does both PPC and SEO based on Revenue - He says a search engine is a search engine is a search engine - Optimize basically the same way for each, but learn and customize - Keep it as simple as possible when optimizing - Search engine optimize web pages not web sites - Both the long and short keyword phrases play a role in his daily job - He discusses the difference between rug and large wool rugs and the level of search volume and the level of conversions - Looks like he ranks number two for rugs in Yahoo! Search - They secure two positions in shopping.com because of the Web site and ebay optimization - Ensure your paid placement budget is at optimal level and budgets - They noticed a higher number of click throughs during the day, but not at night, so they shifted their budget by five hours, they doubled the click throughs on key phrases and increased efficiencies by 29%, which made it easier to increase budget and a bid management system - Day parting has significant ramifications, specifically with pat per call - This guy did not hide any numbers from the audience, i see his total cost in AdWords between jan 1 and feb 19, 2006 was $21,621.34. I have conversion metrics in front of me, but I'll spare him. I mean his email and customer ID is at the top of the page, this is a security risk... - He focuses now on clearance, store, discount, sale and shopping with main keywords like, rug. Example, rug clearance and they only do this organically, because it is too expensive for them in PPC. - Understand the pre, actual and post seasonality across search terms. - SESNY10 is the discount code within 30 days to give a 10% discount (i may use that, I need a rug or two for my new apartment)

David Wauters from BareNecessities.com (too close to comfort for me, I have worked with two of his competitors in the past) - They sell underwear online, mostly women underwear - Worked for this company for about two years (1) Highlight your store promotions - Do a search for maindenform bras and you will see a promotion in the AdWords with 20% off. No one else shows that they sell it for 20% off - Support media mentions, they were lucky to mention a couple of styles Oprah mentioned, so they used Oprah in the ad - Support seasonality in your business; "bra for wedding" they come up in the PPC listings for Wedding Lingerie - Supporting site promotions; "bras" in Google, they are number one in PPC and they show free shipping on orders over $75 in the description. - It is important to use a landing page that supports the value proposition (2) Partner with your buyers to find the right products to sell online - You can be their product research consultant, finding new trends - He shows slides of keyword selector tools with # of searches, nothing crazy - His point is looking for trends in these keyword tools (but didnt mention about the lag of these tools) - Partner with your buyers to reorganize your online store to support demand (example is nursing bras) - Help partners understand your paid search sales; it is easy, can show why sales may have slipped, and helps manage online store real estate properly (3) Life after the selling season - Just because Halloween was Oct. 31st, it doesn't mean the holiday season is over - He showed a slide on search data on valentines gifts and valentines day gift, you see that half the demand was about the week after - Life after department store seasons; he shows search volume on swim wear

- SESOFFER save 20% at BareNecessities.com

Brian Mark at ToolBarn.com - Tail Terms; common phrases will have many competitors, long doesn't mean tail, it can be short also, its all a matter of search frequency, and convert better - Ad Copy; what makes a value proposition? free stuff, he shows two ads and how placing Free in the top line, the CTR increased by 20% (but it seems like he also added DKI in the ad) - Selection and a unique solution; he showed a 65% increase in sales by adding available for APO addresses (selling Gatorade Powder Mix, they are going to the troops) clicks were less but sales way up - Addressing a Need, noticed a 61% CTR and CPC dropped 66% by changing the ad to a more english spoken ad copy - Alternate organic engines -- Become.com, has more importance on quantity of info and quality of links -- Yahoo! Shopping organic - Duplicate Content -- Copy and Paste product specifications and features from manufacturers -- Scraper sites -- Mirror sites -- Older pages -- Competitors -- Splogs -- Web designers -- Under construction sites -- eBay --- eBay is the king of thieves (the sellers), the people who sell copy and paste directly from their site. They email the seller directly and the response comes after the auction if ever. --- They are using mod_rewrite and referrer data to change the data so people can automatically scrap, they have completely automated this (my thoughts...he thinks this is new stuff, but people have been doing this for years), but it is cool that he showed examples of his competitors getting screwed, showing a water stamped product image with the toolbarn.com stamp and the price about 100% the price as should be sold -- Toolbarn.com profits from duplicate content

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Comments:

Brian Mark

03/01/2006 09:08 pm

Actually, I didn't think it was new to swap out images. We've been doing this for quite some time, and I've heard the comment before about swapping it out with something that they don't want on their site. I think it was a new concept to many people in the room, judging by the faces in the audience and the comments people are coming up to me with. Also, some people hadn't understood that it could be made profitable since most of the examples mentioned in the past have involved using pornographic images. What I did think that the bloggers would want to make note of is that people copying your content isn't always a bad thing, and if you're creative it can be turned into a profit center for a merchant. Overall, a good write-up. I'll make sure to address the security issues you mentioned with Shane before the next one. Thanks.

Barry Schwartz

03/01/2006 09:35 pm

Thank you. :)

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